Resisting arrest

Lawfully performing the duties of a peace officer etc. The Prosecutor must prove that, at the time of the offense, the officer was lawfully performing or attempting to perform their professional duties.

Resisting arrest

Entrapment Resisting Arrest The term resisting arrest refers to the act of physically struggling against, or attempting to elude a police officer, in order to escape being restrained. According to the law, a person cannot use physical force to resist being lawfully arrested by a police officer.

The act of resisting arrest is a crime that may be charged above and beyond any other crime for which the individual is charged. To explore this concept, consider the following resisting arrest definition. Definition of Resisting Arrest The act of physically struggling against, attempting to flee from, or threatening a police officer.

What is Resisting Arrest In the United States, the laws hold resisting arrest to be a separate crime that may be charged in addition to, or regardless of, any other crime for which a person may be charged. The act of using force to avoid being restrained, fleeing from a police officer to avoid arrest, and threatening a police officer with bodily harm while attempting to elude arrest are all considered crimes.

The purpose of laws against resisting arrest is to protect law enforcement officers in the discharge of their duty, and to protect the public from harm that may be caused by someone violently resisting, or running from police. In order to enforce these laws, it is necessary to allow a person to be criminally charged, tried, and convicted for resisting arrest, whether or not the individual is charged in the act for which the arrest was made.

In fact, a person can be charged with resisting arrest even if the arrest was not lawful. Other Actions Considered Resisting Arrest Because resisting laws cover acts that obstruct an officer in going about his duties, there are certain other acts that may be charged as resisting arrest or as obstruction.

These include such acts as: Going limp — an individual forcing an officer to carry or drag him in order to accomplish the arrest Third party obstructing — physically obstructing an officer from arresting another person may be charged as a crime, as may delaying officers from accomplishing their goal of investigating a crime, or arresting a suspect.

Such charges would be levied against the third party doing the obstructing. Providing false information — providing a law enforcement officer with a false name or other false personal information, with or without a false ID, in order to avoid arrest, is considered arresting arrest.

Martha joins a group of people protesting a new city ordinance outside the government building. The group is loud, harassing people as they walk to and from the offices doing business. When police attempt to disburse the group, several of them sit down across the access walkway, and refuse to leave.

As an officer places handcuffs on Martha, she refuses to get up, then forces the officers to carry her to a patrol car, as she just allows her body to hang limply. The initial arrest was made for disturbing the peace, and failing to disburse.

Resisting arrest

However, in this example of resisting arrest, Martha may be charged with resisting as a separate crime. Is Resisting Arrest a Felony In most jurisdictions, resisting arrest is a misdemeanorthough it can result in jail time.

In some cases, however, resisting may be charged as a felony.

Robby Anderson of New York Jets arrested at music festival in Miami

This would depend on the level of violence committed by the individual in resisting — and often whether innocent bystanders are injured. Resisting may also be charged as a felony, and be punished with prison time, if the individual has previous convictions for resisting arrest.

Elements of Resisting Arrest In order for a charge of resisting arrest to be successfully prosecuted as a felony, the prosecution must prove certain elements. These elements vary by state, but generally include: Willful Obstruction — The individual willfully, intentionally resisted, delayed, or obstructed a law enforcement officer.

It is not necessary to prove the individual intended the harm caused by his actions. Act or Threat of Violence — The individual acted in a violent manner, or threatened violence against, the law enforcement officer. This might include punching, striking, or shoving the officer, or threatening violence while holding something that could be considered a weapon.

Recognized Public Officer — The individual knew — or reasonably should have known — that the individual he resisted against was a law enforcement officer, or emergency medical technician.Resisting arrest. (1) A person is guilty of resisting arrest if he or she intentionally prevents or attempts to prevent a peace officer from lawfully arresting him or her.

(2) Resisting arrest is a misdemeanor. Nov 11,  · Warning: Explicit language. Sullivan Scott Allen, 52, injured a Grand Rapids police officer in Heartside Park while resisting arrest on Wednesday, Oct. 18, The arrest . Resisting Arrest and Evading Arrest are separate offenses under Texas law.

Resisting arrest is defined in Section of the Penal Code, and Evading arrest is defined in Section These offenses both describe situations in which defendants are accused of trying to keep from being arrested. The term resisting arrest refers to the act of physically struggling against, or attempting to elude a police officer, in order to escape being restrained.

According to the law, a person cannot use physical force to resist being lawfully arrested by a police officer.

The act of resisting arrest is a crime that may be charged above and beyond any other crime for which the individual is charged. Anderson's arrest a potential blow to Jets () ESPN Jets reporter Rich Cimini breaks down how the arrest of WR Robby Anderson could prove problematic for the team.

resisting arrest – definitions, penalties and analysis What is the offense of resisting arrest? Under California Penal Code (a)(1), it is illegal to “resist, delay, or obstruct” a peace officer, public officer, or emergency medical technician in the execution of their duties.

Your Right of Defense Against Unlawful Arrest